214-320-2933 office
bill@foundationinspectors.com
214-505-3661 direct


Why is
there
 movement?

When
should I be
concerned?

How do I
know if there
are problems?

Who
can help
me?

What is
included in
an inspection
What
about
repairs?

What about repairs?

You have a variety of choices in foundation repair.  We have listed the most often used foundation repair supports with a brief description. 
 

Concrete Pressed Pilings

Drilled Piers

Holes are dug below the foundation grade beam wall and pilings.  Generally, the pilings are 8" in length and 4" in diameter.  The are forced into the ground using hydraulic pressure a maximum level as decided by the repair company, until sufficient resistance is met, or a minimum of 10 feet.  Rigid steel pins are installed during the driving process to secure alignment and added strength.   A concrete cap is placed on top of the pilings and foot long concrete cylinders are next.  Steel shims complete the process.

Shafts will be drilled vertically or at an angle next to the foundation and the depth can range from 6 to 20 feet. The shafts are then filled with concrete and have a haunch at the top that usually measures approximately 2 feet square.  The haunch will be located about 1 foot below the foundation.  Drilled piers can be good choice when it is difficult to create holes for other type of foundation supports directly below the foundation.

Steel Pilings Helical Piers
Very similar to Concrete Pressed Pilings in their application, but made from steel and may or may have a corrosion protective "sleeve".  A helix is placed on the end of a steel shaft and the pier is then screwed into the ground.  A cap is either a steel bracket that slips over the vertical shaft and the helix is attached or a "L" shaped bracket that slips over the steel shaft and the helix is then welded in place.  

InterLocking Piers Systems

Pier and Beam Supports

There are basically two types of interlocking systems.  The first uses rebar inserted after the pilings are driven in place and then the rebar is cemented inside the pilings.  The second method is to glue or cement a flexible steel cable in the lead cylinder with the remaining cylinders threaded through the cable.  The end of the cable is then glued or cement to the top cylinder.

 

There are two areas that may needs supports, the perimeter wall which carries the majority of the structure's weight and the interior piers that are used to the support the underlying beam.  The perimeter wall can be supported the same ways as slab and the interior piers are generally concrete blocks or 1 to 3 foot poured concrete columns.  Floors tend to sag when the interior piers are too far apart or there is no longer contact between the pier and the beam.
 

Choosing the best repair option can be confusing.  The choices are dependent on the soil type (steel pilings drive deeper than concrete pilings), access to the foundation grade beam wall and, of course, cost.
 

Email us and we will send you our FREE copy of our Self-Inspection Foundation Checklist.

 bill@foundationinspectors.com


Why is
there
 movement?

When
should I be
concerned?

How do I
know if there
are problems?

Who
can help
me?

What is
included in
an inspection
What
about
repairs?